Summer reads 2015 – Part two

I don’t believe it, it’s time for the second part of my summer to-read list! Since I live in Lausanne, where the weather is so much better than in the Netherlands, I read a lot more. Just after work I like to go to Lake Geneva, and dive into a book while enjoying the natural beauty around me.

For this list I decided to choose the books that have the highest average rating on my Goodreads to-read list. I wrote recently that I thought that most books on Goodreads have comparable ratings (see this post), but these are the exceptions. All of the ones I have selected now, have average ratings higher than 4.50 (except the last one). Can you believe it?! They must be amazing. I had to skip some that where rated very high, either because they were not published yet (why do they have ratings already?) or because I could not get my hands on a copy.

Wow! I’m so much looking forwards to reading these! Here they come:

Messages From An Owl by Max R. Ternan (1996) – Average rating: 4.60

When zoologist Max Terman came to the rescue of a great horned owlet in a Kansas town park, he embarked on an adventure that would test his scientific ingenuity and lead to unprecedented observations of an owl’s hidden life in the wild.

The Name of the Wind (The Kingkiller Chronicle #1) by Patrick Rothfuss (2007) – Average rating: 4.55

Told in Kvothe’s own voice, this is the tale of the magically gifted young man who grows to be the most notorious wizard his world has ever seen. The intimate narrative of his childhood in a troupe of traveling players, his years spent as a near-feral orphan in a crime-ridden city, his daringly brazen yet successful bid to enter a legendary school of magic, and his life as a fugitive after the murder of a king form a gripping coming-of-age story unrivaled in recent literature. A high-action story written with a poet’s hand, The Name of the Wind is a masterpiece that will transport readers into the body and mind of a wizard.

The Wise Man’s Fear (The Kingkiller Chronicle #2) by Patrick Rothfuss (2011) – Average rating: 4.56

My name is Kvothe.
I have stolen princesses back from sleeping barrow kings. I burned down the town of Trehon. I have spent the night with Felurian and left with both my sanity and my life. I was expelled from the University at a younger age than most people are allowed in. I tread paths by moonlight that others fear to speak of during day. I have talked to Gods, loved women, and written songs that make the minstrels weep.
You may have heard of me.

So begins the tale of a hero told from his own point of view — a story unequaled in fantasy literature. Now in The Wise Man’s Fear, an escalating rivalry with a powerful member of the nobility forces Kvothe to leave the University and seek his fortune abroad. Adrift, penniless, and alone, he travels to Vintas, where he quickly becomes entangled in the politics of courtly society. While attempting to curry favor with a powerful noble, Kvothe uncovers an assassination attempt, comes into conflict with a rival arcanist, and leads a group of mercenaries into the wild, in an attempt to solve the mystery of who (or what) is waylaying travelers on the King’s Road.

Memory House by Bette Lee Crosby (2015) – Average rating: 4.54

IS IT POSSIBLE FOR A MEMORY TO OUTLIVE ITS OWNER?
Ophelia Browne knows the answer is yes. She knows because she’s been granted the unique gift of finding and caring for those forgotten memories. But now she’s nearing ninety, and Browne women seldom live beyond ninety.
Before time runs out Ophelia must find a successor. Someone who can take hold of the gifts and keep the memories from fading.
When broken-hearted Annie Cross shows up on the doorstep of The Memory House Bed and Breakfast, Ophelia knows she is the one. The two women forge a bond of friendship as they sip magical dandelion tea and share stories. When Annie starts to sense the memories Ophelia is delighted, but then a thread of violence begins to unravel and Ophelia fears things have gone too far.

The Rise of Zenobia (Overlord #1) by J.D. Smith (2014) – Average rating: 4.38

My name is Zabdas: once a slave; now a warrior, grandfather and servant. I call Syria home. I shall tell you the story of my Zenobia: Warrior Queen of Palmyra, Protector of the East, Conqueror of Desert Lands …
The Roman Empire is close to collapse. Odenathus of Palmyra holds the Syrian frontier and its vital trade routes against Persian invasion. A client king in a forgotten land, starved of reinforcements, Odenathus calls upon an old friend, Julius, to face an older enemy: the Tanukh.
Julius believes Syria should break free of Rome and declare independence. But his daughter’s beliefs are stronger still. Zenobia is determined to realise her father’s dream.
And turn traitor to Rome …

What do you think? Have you read any of these books?

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